Check out this 3D printed record

We all love the sound and feel of vinyl, right?! Have a look at this cool 3-D printed record feature from this amazing tech site. Below, tech savvy MIT grad student Amanda Ghassaei explains how she has been developing a 3-D printed record which sounds and behaves like the real thing. As you’ll see from the video, its still early stages, but once perfected, the potential is incredible.

In order to explore the current limits of 3D printing technology, I’ve created a technique for converting digital audio files into 3D-printable, 33rpm records and printed a few functional prototypes that play on ordinary record players.  Though the audio quality is low -the records have a sampling rate of 11kHz (a quarter of typical mp3 audio) and 5-6 bit resolution (less than one thousandth of typical 16 bit resolution)- the songs are still easily recognizable, watch the video above to see the process and hear what the records sound like.  Also check out my laser cut records, made on wood, paper, and acrylic.

This past year I’ve been posting a lot of audio projects, specifically, I’ve been experimenting with using relatively simple tools and techniques and very little memory to approximate and recreate digital audio signals.  A great example is my Arduino Vocal Effects Box, where I used an Arduino to perform realtime pitch-bending on an incoming audio signal.  Through these projects, I’ve learned that audio is a very resilient medium, it can take a fair amount of abuse (in the form of distortion and compression) while still maintaining most of the integrity of the original sound.  The key is as long as you loosely approximate the overall shape of an audio signal, the output will sound reasonably recognizable.  We have evolution to thank for this: as we hear audio, some complicated processing goes on in our brains that makes us very good at ignoring noise and focusing on the important pieces of information coming through.  We can work off of relatively few cues (sometimes these even include contextual or visual cues) to piece together mangled or noisy audio and make sense of it; this is how we are able to focus on one voice in crowded room or decipher a message sent over a cheap walkie talkie.

This project was my first experiment extending this idea beyond electronics.  I printed these records on a UV-cured resin printer called the Objet Connex500.  Like most 3D printers, the Objet creates an object by depositing material layer by layer until the final form is achieved.  This printer has incredibly high resolution: 600dpi in the x and y axes and 16 microns in the z axis, some of the highest resolution possible with 3D printing at the moment.   Despite all its precision, the Objet is still at least an order of magnitude or two away from the resolution of a real vinyl record.  When I first started this project, I wasn’t sure that the resolution of the Objet would be enough to reproduce audio, but I hoped that I might produce something recognizable by approximating the groove shape as accurately as possible with the tools I had.

3d record 2

In this Instructable, I’ll demonstrate how I developed a workflow that can convert any audio file, of virtually any format, into a 3D model of a record, and how I optimized these records for playback on a real turntable.  The 3D modeling in this project was far too complex for traditional drafting-style CAD techniques, so I wrote an program to do this conversion automatically.  It works by importing raw audio data, performing some calculations to generate the geometry of a record, and eventually exporting this geometry straight to a 3D printable file format.  Most of the heavy lifting is done by Processing, an open source programming environment that’s often used for 2D and 3D graphics and modeling applications.  Here’s a basic overview of my Processing algorithm:

use raw audio data to set the groove depth– parse through the raw audio data, this is the set of numbers that defines the shape of the audio waveform, and use this information to set the height of the bottom of a spiral groove.  This way, when a turntable stylus moves along the groove it will move vertically in the same path as the original waveform and recreate the original audio signal.
draw record and groove geometry– A 3D model is essentially a list of triangles arranged in 3D space to create a continuous mesh, use the data from the last step and some general record parameters (record diameter, thickness, groove width, etc) to generate the list of triangular faces that describes the record’s shape and the detailed spiral groove inscribed on its surface.
export model in STL format– the STL file format is understood by all 3D printers, export the geometry calculated in the last step as an STL file.  To get Processing to export straight to STL, I used the ModelBuilder Library written byMarius Watz (if you are into Arduino/Processing and 3D printing I highly recommend checking this out, it works great).

I’ve uploaded some of my complete record models to the 123D gallery as well as the Pirate Bay.  Check Step 6 for a complete listing of what’s there and what I plan on posting.  Alternatively, you can go to Step 7 to download my code and learn how to make printable record models from your own audio. Special thanks to Randy Sarafan, Steve Delaire, Arthur Harsuvanakit, Phil Seaton, and Audrey Love for their help with this project.