A design duo in Japan, has just created a set of Nameless Paints that aim to completely change the way children learn and think about colour

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The names we assign to colors are restrictive and only serve to impede our minds. The water that comes out of a faucet isn’t “blue.” Leaves on the trees can be “green” but they can be so much more. In Japan there’s even the absurd hada-iro (skin color), a peachy color that’s so wrong I’m not even going to begin. But now a young designer duo wants to change the way kids learn about color. They’ve created a set of “Nameless Paints” whose colors are simply identified by just that – their color.

“By not assigning names to the colors we want to expand the definition of what a color can be, and the various shades they can create by mixing them,” explains Yusuke Imai. Together with Ayami Moteki they form the design duo Ima Moteki.

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Instead of names, each tube in the 10-color paint set is identified by one or more circles of color. For tubes with more than one circle, the size of the circle indicates the proportion of paint that were mixed to create the resulting color. It’s a radical new way of getting kids to intuitively understand color and remove the preconceptions that names like “green” and “blue” create.

Source [spoon-tamago]


About the author

For the last 20+ years, Damion has been an international touring DJ, promoter, touring agent, label owner, magazine editor and producer. He is currently the Group Editor and Managing Director of Decoded Magazine. Hear more at https://soundcloud.com/damionpell-1

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